Doctors misdiagnosed woman’s cancer as ‘teenage laziness.’

This woman’s doctor reportedly shrugged off her ailments and said the answer was “laziness,” but it turns out she had cancer.

When Courtney Nettleton, a 21-year-old from Wakefield, West Yorkshire, felt “uncontrollably” tired and slept 14 hours every day during the summer of 2021, she feared something was wrong.

“The doctors told me it was just teenage laziness,” Nettleton told NeedtoKnow.online. But after co-workers noticed a large lump Coming out of the blonde’s neck in January 2022, a specialist discovered the true cause of her chronic illness.

“In February, I was diagnosed with thyroid cancer and the doctors told me it was growing rapidly,” he said. “I was so devastated and worried.”

The American Cancer Society estimate that there has been 43,800 new cases of thyroid cancer in the United States so far in 2022, with 11,860 cases found in men and 31,940 in women.

“I knew deep down that something wasn’t right, and to be told by the doctors that it was just a lazy teen was incredibly frustrating,” Nettleton, who works as a senior care assistant, told Jam Press.

Doctors initially told Nettleton that his incessant sleepiness was nothing more than “adolescent laziness.”
Composite NYPost

in the previous months receiving his grim prognosisNettleton experienced a number of unusual symptoms including tiredness, shortness of breath, hot flashes, unsteadiness, a stiff neck, acne and mood swings.

But he claims his health care provider dismissed his complaints as trivializing them as age-related growing pains. And so, she resumed her usual routine, going to work and hanging out with friends. Nettleton’s original doctors have not yet responded to requests for comment, according to the Jam Press.

Though he feared something was wrong with his body, Nettleton followed his doctor's advice and ignored his symptoms.
Though he feared something was wrong with his body, Nettleton followed his doctor’s advice and ignored his symptoms.
Jam Press/@courtneynettleton

However, earlier this year, everything changed after colleagues pointed out the deformity in her neck and urged her to seek a second opinion.

“My friends noticed a small lump on my neck at work and that, combined with my symptoms, pushed me to schedule a doctor’s appointment the next day,” Nettleton said. “I was referred urgently in two weeks for an ultrasound that confirmed I had a solid thyroid tumor.”

After receiving his diagnosis, Nettleton underwent a series of surgeries in hopes of eradicating his cancer.
After receiving his diagnosis, Nettleton underwent a series of surgeries in hopes of eradicating his cancer.
Jam Press/@courtneynettleton

He immediately began treatment a month later, in March he had two surgeries scheduled for remove both halves of your thyroid.

But unfortunately, Nettleton’s troubles were far from over.

On March 22, between surgeries, he says doctors told him he didn’t have cancer.

“After my first surgery, my doctor called me and told me that I was completely cancer free and that I had nothing to worry about,” he recalled.

But, after enjoying a brief period of relief, Nettleton was told that she still had cancer and that the cancer cells had spread to other areas of her body.

Nettleton underwent surgery and is anxiously awaiting the results of the procedures.
Nettleton underwent surgery and is anxiously awaiting the results of the procedures.
Jam Press/@courtneynettleton

“My consultant called me just three days after this to tell me that cancer cells were found in the lymphatic channels and blood vessels inside my thyroid and that I would need more surgery and radioactive iodine,” he said.

“I was so upset when I found out I still had cancer,” Nettleton said. “I had to tell my family and friends that I was not cancer-free and that I had more treatment ahead of me.”

Since then, she has undergone two more surgical procedures, which have left her feeling “weak” and “anxious”.

“The first surgery made me very sick and I was tied to the bed and the radioactive iodine made me feel very weak, and I had to be isolated in a room that was very lonely,” she recalled.

“I’ll find out the results in about six weeks to see if this has been successful or not,” added Nettleton, who relies on friends and family for support during her post-op recovery.

Nettleton is now raising funds for cancer research and support in his country.
Nettleton is now raising funds for cancer research and support in his country.
Jam Press/@courtneynettleton

“Waiting is disgusting, I have the constant consolation of [Macmillan Cancer Trust] and my social worker, and although my cancer is highly curable, there is always the concern that it could spread to other places,” she continued. “I suffer from severe anxiety, so I am constantly worried.”

She also finds comfort at work and is grateful for the love she continues to receive from her co-workers.

“Work has been very supportive throughout the journey and has been supportive of me constantly,” said Nettleton, who will take part in a charity skydiving event to raise awareness and money for the Macmillan Cancer Trust and the Teenage Cancer Trust.

She also threw a GoFundMe to raise money for the cause.

“While I am sorely disappointed by the doctors, the staff at Macmillan, my consultant and Leeds St James’s Hospital have been absolutely amazing throughout my journey,” Nettleton gushed.

And now he is imploring others to always advocate for themselves.

“Everyone knows their own body more than anyone else,” he said. “It is very important to trust your gut and follow your gut: you have to stand up for yourself when you know something is not right.”

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