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COVID hospital admissions double in two weeks in England

by Ozva Admin
Infections within the community and within hospitals are on the rise.  (Getty)

Infections within the community and within hospitals are on the rise. (Getty)

COVID-related Hospital admissions have doubled in England in the last two weeks, new NHS data shows.

Hospital admissions for a seven-day average in England rose to 1,129 for the week ending September 30.

This was an increase from 574 two weeks earlier and 33% more than the previous week.

The number of people in hospital beds in England with COVID has increased by 87% in the last two weeks.

Read more: Blood test when people are infected ‘can predict who will develop prolonged COVID’

Bed occupancy in England has been on the rise ahead of the onset of winter.  (Yahoo)

Bed occupancy in England has been on the rise ahead of the onset of winter. (Yahoo)

Dr. Susan Hopkins, chief medical adviser to the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), said the latest increases were “worrying” and that cases and hospitalization rates were at their “highest level in months.” “.

“Hospital and nursing home outbreaks are also on the rise,” he said.

Independent Sage professor Christina Pagel said both admissions where COVID is the primary problem and where it is a secondary problem are rising rapidly.

He said this pointed to a rise in infections both in the community and in hospitals.

Pagel said we were now in another wave of COVID, which was “a very bad time for the NHS where things are already dire”.

“Be encouraged if you can wear a mask in crowded indoor spaces if possible and open windows.”

Read more: Here’s why some people are more likely to die from COVID

There has been a sharp increase in hospital admissions.  (Yahoo)

There has been a sharp increase in hospital admissions. (Yahoo)

The news comes as the latest statistics on prolonged COVID show that more than a million people in the UK likely had their initial infection more than a year ago.

A total of 2.3 million people across the country are now estimated to be suffering from prolonged COVID, or 3.5% of the population.

The figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) are based on self-reported long COVID from a sample of people in the four weeks to September 3.

Read more: UK could be hit by ‘twin demic’ of winter flu surge and COVID wave

COVID cases have been on the rise in recent weeks.  (Getty)

COVID cases have been on the rise in recent weeks. (Getty)

They show that of the 2.3 million people estimated to have prolonged COVID, 1.1 million (46% of the total) had COVID-19 for the first time, or were suspected of having the virus, at least 12 months ago.

Some 514,000 (22%) had COVID for the first time at least two years before.

The data reveals a wide disparity in age groups, with one in 20 (5%) aged 35-69 in the UK suffering from prolonged COVID, while only 2.9% of those over 70 reported the same.

People working in social care reported the highest prevalence of prolonged COVID among employment groups (5.5%), followed by local government officials and staff (5.2%) and care employees and teachers medical (5.0%).

Levels were lowest in occupations such as financial services (3.4%), hospitality (3.5%), and information technology (3.8%).

The ONS estimated that prolonged COVID was affecting the daily lives of 1.6 million people, with 342,000 saying their ability to carry out daily activities had been “very limited”.

Fatigue is the most common symptom (experienced by 69% of people with prolonged COVID), followed by difficulty concentrating (45%), shortness of breath (42%), and muscle pain (40%).

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